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What’s Really Inside Dog Toothpaste

Late last year I was lucky enough to attend the Masterchops Canine Health and Nutrition Seminar in Melbourne, Australia. It was hosted by Phivo “The Dog Health Guy”, and at the risk of sounding like a complete nutter – it was SERIOUSLY one of the best days of my life!

rita at masterchops melbourne

Amongst the amazing speakers, which included Rodney Habib, Dr Karen Becker, Dr Ian Billinghurst and Dr Bruce Syme, I was very interested in a presentation given by Brian Borg. He is a world-renowned expert in animal dentistry, and founder of Fresh Breath Doggie Dental. Brian presented information about the importance of canine dental care and the link between periodontal disease and other chronic disease states involving the liver, heart and kidneys.

Upon returning home, and feeling all inspired, I decided to start incorporating teeth brushing into Poppy’s routine. She was already being given a variety of raw, meaty bones and natural chews, which seemed to be doing a great job of keeping her teeth clean, but I wanted to cover all bases and ensure her teeth remained healthy and strong.

poppy dog teeth

I set off to purchase a doggie toothbrush, which was easy enough. It wasn’t until I started shopping for dog toothpaste, that things got truly horrifying and very concerning. All of the toothpastes I looked at had a long list of chemicals, flavourings, and colours, a number of the toothpastes had no ingredients at all listed on the label [alarm bells], and most of them clearly stated – “Not intended for human use” [double alarm bells].

After much searching, I decided the safest route would be to make my own natural toothpaste using coconut oil, which is a wonderful antibacterial (it is particularly good at inhibiting Streptococcus mutans, one of the primary bacteria responsible for tooth decay) and a much safer alternative to the chemically laden dog toothpastes on the market.

Here are some of the common ingredients I found hiding inside dog toothpastes…

Whats hiding inside dog toothpaste poster

Brushing your dog’s teeth is a fantastic way of ensuring their dental and overall health is in tip top condition. If you choose to purchase a commercially made dog toothpaste PLEASE read and research the ingredients before using on your precious pooch.

Rita x

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dog toothpaste



5 Responses

  1. I’ve read all ingredients on all teeth products/toothpaste in USA & ALL have at least one terrible toxic component. I use Vets Best dental gel with natural supportive ingredients. It isn’t marketed as a toothpaste but my friends and I use it as one. Mix in a little baking soda for more abrasive action.

    Our holistic vet in Hawaii, Dr Ihor Basko, has a lovely informational article regarding teeth/dogs: http://www.drbasko.com/site/six-ways-dental-clean/

    I am helping a rescue right now with abysmal teeth so I’ve incorporated the Vets Best Gel as a base, then added in Dr Basko’s suggestion of Hydrogen Peroxide 3%, aloe, baking soda. Also for good luck: a few drops of dragons blood for gum healing and tissue regeneration (antiviral antibacterial antifungal anti-tumor ).

    • So glad to hear that I’m not the only who was shocked by the ingredients in these products. I have just had a look at the Vets Best Dental gel, and wow it looks like such a great formula. I will have to see whether it is available here in Australia, and also do some more research on the other products. Great to know there are some natural alternatives out there. Thank you so much for the recommendations Faerie Dog Mother 🙂

  2. A natural systemic option w/studies behind it: PlaqueOff from seaweed.
    http://www.plaqueoff.com/animal/ProDen-PlaqueOff-Dental-Bites.html

    They have a human version too.

  3. One more – oral supplement: DentaVen™ provides patented probiotic support for tooth and gum health. This formula features a unique, highly desirable strain of Streptococcus salivarius that is able to colonize and beneficially reside in the mouth. It has been shown to be effective for healthy gum support.

  4. […] You’ll often find a list of unknown and unpronounceable nasties like sodium carboxymethyicellulose, liquid paraffin and carrageenan. Some of which have been found to have a possible link to stomach cancer. […]

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